Skills

This section contains additional skills pertaining to the specific campaign world.

Additionally, there are lists of possible Craft skills and Professions of this world suitable for your character to learn. They are presented here to broaden the options when fleshing out your character, and to give you a better idea of how the world works.

Arcane Ritual [Int; Trained Only]

This skill is only available to sorcerers and wizards. Use this skill to cast arcane rituals. In order to cast an arcane ritual you must also possess the ritual scroll for the specific ritual you wish to cast. The ritual scroll will also contain information of the casting of the ritual, including casting time, effects, and components, etc. All arcane rituals use korba as a special material component.
Check: Arcane rituals are a particularly tricky and difficult form of magic to wield. For this reason there is no guarantee of success when you cast an arcane ritual. The outcome of rituals is also more variable than for most spells. Once the casting of the ritual is complete, you must make a skill check to see if the casting was successful.

Craft [Int]

This list of Craft skills are but some of those available in this campaign:

Alchemist (makes alchemical items)
Arrowsmith (forges arrow heads)
Basketweaver (makes baskets from willow, straw, cane and other flexible plants, or from wire)
Bellfounder (makes bronze and brass bells and other such items)
Blacksmith (makes armor, shields, tools, weapons and other metal items from iron and steel)
Bookbinder (makes and binds books and folios) Bowyer (makes archer’s bows from horn, wood and/or sinew)
Brewer (makes beer by soaking, boiling and fermenting)
Brownsmith (makes items from copper)
Builder (constructs buildings and monuments from wood and stone)
Carpenter (makes and repairs objects and structures, typically of wood)
Calligrapher (produces decorative handwriting or lettering with a pen or brush)
Chandler (makes candles of tallow and wax)
Charcoal Burner (burns wood, bone char or other substances, producing fuel primarily for furnaces and forges)
Clockmaker (makes mechanical and water clocks)
Cobbler (a person who repairs shoes)
Composer (creates music from simple songs to quartets music and symphonies)
Cook (creates and prepares food for consumption)
Cordwainer (makes shoes and other articles from fine soft leather)
Embalmer (preserves a corpse from decay using spices, includes preparing mummies from dead bodies)
Fletcher (makes arrows from wood or rushes)
Gemcutter (cuts, shapes and polishes gemstones)
Glassmaker (makes glass from silica and varied other ingredient)
Glassblower (makes glassware by blowing air through a tube of semi-molten glass)
Goldsmith (forges or casts items from gold) Herbalist (creates herbal medicines and remedies)
Illuminator (creates illuminations and border artwork for books, usually religious texts)
Jeweler (makes items from precious metals and gems)
Leatherworker (creates functional items and armor from cured leather)
Locksmith (makes and repairs locks and such mechanisms)
Mason (builds with brick or stone)
Papermaker (presses paper from wood pulp using a mill)
Painter (makes works of art using various pigments)
Pewtersmith (forges or casts items from pewter)
Playwright (or Dramatist, writes dramatic literature, usually intended to be performed as plays)
Poisonmaker (creates poisons and toxins)
Potter (makes items in clay)
Reed Presser (makes papyrus)
Sculptor (carves statues or reliefs, usually from stone or wood)
Shipwright (builds boats and ships)
Silversmith (forges or casts items from silver)
Stonemason (fashions many stone blocks for use in great keeps, cathedrals and other buildings)
Tailor (makes clothing and outfits, usually from cloth or soft leather)
Tanner (makes leather goods and parchment)
Tattooer (punctures the skin and inserts pigments, marking the body with an indelible design)
Tinsmith (forges or casts items out of tin)
Trapmaker (builds traps and snares from a wide variety of materials)
Vintner (makes wine)
Weaponsmith (forges weapons)
Weaver (spins and weaves cloth)
Wheelwright (makes wheeled vehicles such as chariots)
Whitesmith (someone who polishes or finishes metal)
Wigmaker (makes hair pieces for men and women from the hair of others)
Woodworker (makes wooden items decorative items such as woodcuts)
Wordsmith (creates works using words, such as poems, epic tales, stories, and such works as reference books)

Divine Ritual [Int; Trained Only]

This skill is only available to clerics, druids and priests.

Use this skill to cast divine rituals. In order to cast an divine ritual you must also possess the ritual scroll for the specific ritual you wish to cast. The ritual scroll will also contain information of the casting of the ritual, including casting time, effects, and components, etc. All arcane rituals use korba as a special material component.
Check: Divine rituals are a particularly tricky and difficult form of magic to wield. For this reason there is no guarantee of success when you cast an divine ritual. The outcome of rituals is also more variable than for most spells. Once the casting of the ritual is complete, you must make a skill check to see if the casting was successful.

Profession [Wis; Trained Only]

Typical professions are given below. This list is not exhaustive.

Certain situations (which have nothing to do with the amount of pay the character earns in a given week) may require the use of a Profession Skill checks, such as driving a cart during a chase. Other professions rely on skills related to their nature, such as Diplomacy Skill checks for a professional Diplomat.

Apothecary (studies the mixing of chemicals, elements and other materials for predictable results, and sells such items to others)
Artillerist (loads, aims and fires cannons)
Assassin (kills for money or political or religious reasons)
Astrologer (follows the night sky for astrological signs for use with spellcasting, or to determine clues revealing the future)
Barrister (speaks on a client’s behalf in court as instructed by a solicitor)
Bartender (serves drinks at a bar)
Boatman (pilots small water craft, usually earning a living by transporting people or cargo)
Bookkeeper (keeps records of the financial affairs of a business)
Butler (the chief manservant of a house)
Chimney Sweep (cleans out the soot from chimneys)
Clerk (record keeper who undertakes routine administrative duties; one who is employed by a judge, barrister or solicitor to perform legal research)
Commander (the leader of a body of troops)
Cook (prepares food for a household or large group of people)
Concubine (generally a woman performing an ongoing, matrimonial-like relationship by economic arrangement, with a man whom she cannot marry, usually because she is of lower social rank)
Council Member (one who serves on a legislative body)
Courtesan/Courtier (ones who attends the court of a monarch or other powerful person, usually offering gratification and/or companionship to such influential persons)
Dancer (performs physical dances for employment)
Digger (a person who performs the manual labor of digging, such as ditches, trenches or graves).
Diplomat (an official representing a country abroad)
Diviner (a fortune teller who may or may not have occult powers – each type of divination should be learned separately: Astrology, Augury (Omen Reading), Card Reading, Dice Reading (also Runecasting), Dream Interpretation, Oracle (Divine Possession), Palmistry, Scapulomancy (Bone casting/reading), Scrying, Tea Leaf Reading, Visionary (visions).
Doctor (a physician who uses medicine and skill to heal the wounded and sick – usually without penetrating the skin or making incisions)
Driver (one who drives carts, wagons, chariots, and coaches)
Engineer (designers and maintainers of engines, machines, or public works)
Executioner (used to kill helpless people efficiently)
Farmer (owns or manages a farm)
Fisherman (catches fish for a living)
Functionary (performs official functions or duties; an official)
Governor (one who manages a household or an estate; also one who manages children of those of high social position)
Grave Robber (steals bodies and sells them to those wishing to study anatomy, or for the body parts for necromancy, or to steal any valuable items buried with the deceased)
Groom (a person employed to take care of horses)
Guardsman (a member of a military or civilian force)
Guide (one who knows an area, region, or district and is employed to help others find their way in and through them)
Handmaid (a female servant, usually a personal attendant of a socially elevated woman)
Herbalist (studies and collects herbs and remedies)
Herdsman (owner or keeper of a herd of domesticated animals)
Hunter (a person that hunts for others, or hunts and sells the animal meat, hide and by-products to others)
Innkeeper (maintains and runs an inn)
Judge (a public official appointed by a leader or council to decide cases of law in their stead)
Laborer (performing unskilled, manual work for wages)
Librarian (one who administers assets in a library)
Landlord (one who manages a building with the intent to house others within)
Lobbyist (one who is hired to influence others, such as public officials, usually by persuasion or diplomacy)
Lumberman/Lumberjack (one who fells trees, cuts them into logs, or transports them to a sawmill)
Maid (a female domestic servant)
Merchant (a person involved in trade, usually trading and selling goods and wares)
Messenger (carries messages, written or verbal, for others)
Midwife (one who is trained to assist women in childbirth)
Milkmaid (a girl or woman who milks cows)
Miller (one who grinds works in or owns a mill, grinding a solid substance into a powder or pulp, usually grist to flour. Also wood into paper pulp, or korba into its powder form)
Milliner (sells hats and clothing to men, women and children, and occasionally makes new clothing from old clothing (Craft: tailor skill))
Miner (one who works in a mine, usually digging tunnels to excavate ore or coal)
Moneylender (a usurer whose business is lending money to others who pay interest, or exchanging currencies for a fee)
Navigator (one who directs the route or corse of a ship by using instruments and maps)
Nursemaid (a woman or girl employed to look after a young child or children)
Ostler (one employed to look after the horses of people staying at an inn, manor, or keep)
Painter (paints buildings, walls, ceilings and woodwork)
Pilot (the person who controls a ship or other large vessel)
Piss Boy (a manservant whose job is to mind the bucket of urination for aristocrats)
Porter (employed to carry luggage and other loads; one who carries supplies on an expedition)
Rancher (manages a ranch, often for nobles)
Rat-catcher (catching rats as a form of pest control)
Reed-cutter (harvests and gathers reeds and rushes for used in matting, baskets, for floor covering, and the making of papyrus)
Sailor (one who works on a large sailing vessel, and often manipulates smaller vessels through the water)
Scribe (one who copies out documents and books)
Servant (performs duties for others, such as domestic duties or as a personal attendant)
Shepherd (tends and rears sheep)
Shopkeeper (manages the affairs of a shop, often employed by the shop owner)
Siege Engineer (designer and constructor of fortifications and weapons of war)
Slave Trader (procurer, trader and seller of sentient beings as slaves)
Solicitor (an attorney who can act in the place of their client for legal purposes and may conduct litigation by making applications to the court, writing letters in litigation, to the client’s opponents and so on)
Stableman (employed in a stable, usually mucking out stalls, feeding the horses and maintaining the stable)
Surgeon (one who mends broken bones and tends to other internal injuries by penetrating the skin and making incisions)
Tavernkeeper (manages and runs a tavern)
Teacher (an expert who instructs others in their field of expertise)
Teamster (the driver of a team of animals; dock or warehouse workers who load and unload ships and wagons)
Translator (one fluent in multiple languages hired to make communication possible between parties that do not speak each other’s languages)
Undertaker (prepares dead bodies for funeral rites, often the one who digs the graves and builds the coffins)
Valet (a man’s personal attendant, responsible for his clothes and appearance)
Water-seller (transports and sells water, usually in a large city or in remote locales where water is scarce)
Wet Nurse (a woman employed to suckle another woman’s child)
Whipping Boy (a young person educated with a young noble or royal person and punished in his place when the noble would otherwise deserve punishment)
Woodcutter (cuts wood, usually for fuel or for use in building)

House Rules

LIBRARY

Librarysmallest

Skills

Crimson Skies PhoenixMark